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California kleptocrats auctioning airport confiscata on eBay

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18
Richard
10-31-2007
11:58 AM ET (US)
The TSA is very careful to say they do not confiscate anything. You are always free to keep your stuff, since it is always your choice to not fly. They do permit you to voluntarily surrender items so you can fly. Thus they are not "confiscating" or "stealing" anything.
17
rob
10-31-2007
10:08 AM ET (US)
What else are they going to do with all that crap?

I've been busted with tools, and was given the option to get out of line and go mail them to myself, check them, or dump them. If you're still balking about the fact that they took your nail clippers or leatherman, you need more to do. If you can't afford to lose it, don't take it when you travel.

I think the security theatre at the airport is ridiculous, but don't fault them for looking at creative ways to get rid of all the junk you have to leave there. You may not like the rules, but the fact remains they are the rules. If you're outraged that they're selling your pocketknives on ebay, stop trying to get your pocketknives on the plane.
Edited 10-31-2007 10:11 AM
16
Tony
10-30-2007
09:34 PM ET (US)
The Dayton airport (Ohio) has this very kind of kiosk courtesy of the USPS...paid for by the poor passenger, tho.
15
rustyPerson was signed in when posted
03-13-2003
01:06 PM ET (US)
I just flew to Washington DC and back with a 4 inch semi-serrated knife in my carry-on. If these new theft-based security procedures are making anyone feel safer, think again. It's a total load of crap. You are not a single bit safer now than you were on September 10th, 2001. The only difference is that now you get to take off your shoes and unbuckle your belt for Uncle Sam.
14
Zed LopezPerson was signed in when posted
03-12-2003
07:11 PM ET (US)
Here's the goods:

http://cgi6.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?View...1&showpics=1&stab=0

Includes 4 radial tires, a 15" monitor, and leather jackets.

Back in '91 or so, I accidentally brought a pocket knife with an almost 4" blade (i.e. an ordinary large pocket knife -- this probably varies state-by-state, but, generally a blade > 4" starts to violate concealed weapons laws) on a flight. The airline checked it, and when it didn't arrive on my flight, delivered it to me by shuttle the next day.

I flew from Montreal to home in the summer of 2001 with the same knife, without any fuss.

ah, those were the days.
13
doggoPerson was signed in when posted
03-12-2003
05:44 PM ET (US)
Would it kill 'em to give you the option to mail it to yourself? I mean, if some of these things are heirlooms, then people should be able to drop it in an envelope (provided by the TSA) and get it mailed home for a fee, or postage due.

I'd be pissed to lose a $50 pocketknife. 'Course now we all know better than to bring 'em with us in our pockets. They don't take 'em out of checked luggage, do they?
12
DaveWPerson was signed in when posted
03-12-2003
05:37 PM ET (US)
Could be she'd have sold it to terrorists.
11
SoliloquyPerson was signed in when posted
03-12-2003
04:17 PM ET (US)
I'm sure that little girl with her baton represented a threat to the republic.
10
QrazyQatPerson was signed in when posted
03-12-2003
02:12 PM ET (US)
""Among the oddest items confiscated and sold were... a little girl's baton."

I don't know if shock and outrage is the proper response, or total amazement that some "security" guard felt a threat.

Hmm... Can't I have both?"

You should've heard where that little South-Parker told him to stick it!
9
KeefyPerson was signed in when posted
03-12-2003
02:11 PM ET (US)
If downloading music is "stealing", then surely this is as well. "Confiscated and sold", sure! Even the word "confiscate" has implies that goods were immoral or that you shouldn't have it. A childs baton or a Leatherman are hardly fits that description!
8
DaveWPerson was signed in when posted
03-12-2003
01:41 PM ET (US)
I think the TSA should set up golden Asscrack icons at each stanchion where nail clippers, batons and sharp car keys can be deposited to placate an angry Security God, and activate a chance to win a New Cadillac.
Edited 03-12-2003 01:52 PM
7
David MercerPerson was signed in when posted
03-12-2003
01:38 PM ET (US)
Wow, yet another reason to be glad I'm FROM California, as in past tense.
6
Chris SmithPerson was signed in when posted
03-12-2003
01:11 PM ET (US)

You have to get the incentive right.

Don't have TSA do it. Have either the USPS or FedEX do it. They could grow their business enormously, since some of this stuff may have notable sentimental value, and customers may pay a premium NOT to have the stuff confiscated. They could even hire someone to do a "pre-screen" - so that you can find out what will fail, and arrange to ship it. They're already in the shipping business, so they know the ins and outs.

Final option for some stuff - a "charity deposit box" for stuff that won't pass, but is not worth shipping.

Done properly, this is a money maker for the shipper, and gets a whole raft of work and heartache (taking the little girl's baton) away from the TSA. Should speed up lines, too.
Taking the scut work away from the TSA would let them concentrate more on real security, and not hiring people to take away your nail clippers.
5
MarkyPerson was signed in when posted
03-12-2003
01:02 PM ET (US)
"Among the oddest items confiscated and sold were... a little girl's baton."

I don't know if shock and outrage is the proper response, or total amazement that some "security" guard felt a threat.

Hmm... Can't I have both?
4
Cory DoctorowPerson was signed in when posted
03-12-2003
12:43 PM ET (US)
"Those who would sacrifice multitools for temporary security deserve neither."
3
flyboogPerson was signed in when posted
03-12-2003
12:41 PM ET (US)
Before Sept 11, confiscated items were held for your return (I don't know what happened to your stuff if you traveled one-way). While I accept the fact that the deluge of confiscated items today prevents such a policy, theft is still theft, and I agree with the previous writer's idea on making mailers and postage available at security checkpoints.

With such a policy (return by postage upon demand), if you have the time and money necessary to buy a mailer and postage and to fill out your address, you could keep your property. TSA could set up a small holding area so that people using this procedure wouldn't block the hoards rushing to their gates.

Hmmmm . . . why *aren't* we doing this?

Regards,
Paul
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