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Welcome to the Zarthani.net H. Beam Piper mailing list and discussion forum. Initiated in October 2008 (after the demise of the original PIPER-L mailing list), this tool for shared communication among Piper fans provides an e-mail list and a discussion forum with on-line archives.
 
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2187
Dietmar Arthur WehrPerson was signed in when posted
04-11-2021
01:02 UT
After a long absence, I'm back on the forum. Years ago, I self-published a sequel to Piper's Cosmic Computer titled Cosmic Computer Legacy: The Tides of Chaos. For reasons that I still don't understand, Amazon had a problem with it and removed it from availability. I've now been able to re-publish a revised and edited version under the same title. If you've read The Merlin Gambit co-authored by me and John Carr, then be aware that Tides of Chaos and The Merlin Gambit share roughly 50,000 words of material that I wrote. Carr added another 30,000 words or so for The Merlin Gambit and later on I added another 30,000 words of my own to my original 50,000 for an expanded Tides of Chaos. So the first 60% is going to be the same in both books. My other Piper sequels (to Space Viking) were also taken off the market by Amazon and I have no plans right now to do anything with them. I am working on the first novel(of a new series) which starts right at the end of the System States Alliance war. I'll have more to say about that when it's published.
D.A.W.
2186
David SoobyPerson was signed in when posted
04-08-2021
13:19 UT
David Johnson said:

> I don't understand is how Rylla would have managed to learn the language of an
> "apparently unrelated" foreign society. Knowing how to speak the language--and
> assuming that unfamiliar strangers might be from this place where she knows the
> language--would seem to suggest some degree of interaction and therefore that the
> Northron society [i]isn't[/i] "unrelated" after all. . . .

Yet generations of English schoolboys were taught Classical Greek and Latin, despite their teachers having no interaction with either the Roman Empire nor Classical Greece.

If Rhylla had been taught a second language for /whatever/ reason, it's hardly a surprise that she might have, probably would have, tried to communicate with that if her attempt to converse in her native tongue failed. Probably no harm in trying!

David Sooby aka "Lensman"
2185
David "PiperFan" JohnsonPerson was signed in when posted
04-08-2021
00:37 UT
~
John "Calidore" Anderson wrote:

> . . . while as noted by John Carr, the modern Terran
> expansion into space eventually causes "new species
> differentiation. On Agni, a hot-star planet the
> inhabitants are said to be tough for Neo-barbarians,
> and to have very dark skin." (Federation, pp. xxiii-xxiv)

With all due respect to John, Mohammed Ali "Ham" O'Brien whose "skin was almost black," was also "born on Agni, under a hot B3 sun," but he doesn't seem to be a different species of Terro-human. . . .

Cheers,

David
--
"The amount of intermarriage that's gone on since the First Century, any resemblance between people's names and their appearances is purely coincidental." - Walt Boyd point-of-view (H. Beam Piper), ~Four-Day Planet~
~
2184
David "PiperFan" JohnsonPerson was signed in when posted
04-08-2021
00:23 UT
~
John "Calidore" Anderson wrote:

> I think David answered his own question in his original post.
> It's the language of the "small and apparently unrelated patch
> [of civilization] at the northern corner of the continent."
> (Federation, p. 206) When the Terrans don't answer Rylla
> in Sosti, she realizes that they're not native to the river-valley
> kingdoms. So she would naturally think they might be from
> that other civilization--the only other one she would know
> of--and try talking to them in that tongue.

I agree this seems like a reasonable possibility but what I don't understand is how Rylla would have managed to learn the language of an "apparently unrelated" foreign society. Knowing how to speak the language--and assuming that unfamiliar strangers might be from this place where she knows the language--would seem to suggest some degree of interaction and therefore that the Northron society [i]isn't[/i] "unrelated" after all. . . .

> The idea of a separate, priestly language is interesting, but
> unfortunately not supported by the story. "The language,
> they found, was called Sosti; it was spoken all over the
> river-valley system to which the Freyan civilization was
> confined. The civilization was an ancient one; the language
> was uniform, and the culture and economy unified." (ibid.,
> p. 229)

I also recognize that there is no mention in the yarn (or subsequently in ~Lord Kalvan~) of any sort of "religious" language but it [i]is[/i] actually possible to understand how Rylla might have learned such a language, unlike whatever language those "unrelated" Northrons spoke.

It's a conundrum.

Cheers,

David
--
"And if he went back, there was a warrant waiting for him from the Federation Member Republic of Venus." - Roger Barron (H. Beam Piper), "When in the Course--"
~
2183
David "PiperFan" JohnsonPerson was signed in when posted
04-08-2021
00:02 UT
~
Dave Eden wrote:

> John's comment of the Martian colonization of Terra
> brings something to mind. Does anyone have any
> insight on why Piper chose this idea for his world?

I'm guessing it may simply be that those sorts of "planetary romances" were still popular enough in 1951 to earn Piper, perhaps with a bit of urging from Fred Pohl, a welcome $72.

Cheers,

David
--
"It is not . . . the business of an author of fiction to improve or inspire or educate his reader, or to save the world from fascism, communism, racism, capitalism, socialism, or anything else. [The author's] main objective is to purvey entertainment of the sort his reader wants. If he has done this, by writing interestingly about interesting people, human or otherwise, doing interesting things, he has discharged his duty and earned his check." - H. Beam Piper, "Double: Bill Symposium" interview
~
2182
David SoobyPerson was signed in when posted
04-07-2021
23:49 UT
Dave Eden said:

> John's comment of the Martian colonization of Terra brings something to mind. Does
> anyone have any insight on why Piper chose this idea for his world?

This has been thoroughly explored before in previous discussions, but I think most of us old-timers don't want to discourage newer readers from asking familiar questions. There's nothing wrong with going over that ground again for new readers. Those who don't want to re-plow this ground can ignore this discussion.

Let's keep in mind that while the Martian origin of Terro-Humans is firmly established in early Paratime stories, Piper himself abandoned the idea in later stories, having the characters talk about the differences in the timelines being based on human mutations rather than the earlier concept of the degree of success or failure of the Martian attempt to colonize Earth.

As far as whether or not "Genesis" also suggests a Martian origin for Terro-Humans in the THFH (Terro-Human Future History), that's a controversy which has raged on this and other Piper discussion forums for ages, and it's not going to be resolved. The reason it's not going to be resolved is that Piper himself gives us contradictory indications. One can't read "Omnilingual" without asking oneself just why none of these brilliant scientists ever raises the possibility that the reason why Martians and Terro-Humans appear exactly alike, and are depicted in paintings as having cultures very like Terro-Human cultures, is that they are the same species, with a common origin.

Piper appears to be possibly the last hard-SF writer to cling to the "parallel evolution" idea, which by modern genetics is nonsense, but it was a very popular notion in early American SF. The "planet stories", such as Burroughs' well-known Barsoom series, set on Mars, but also the Amtor series, set on Venus, postulated human inhabitants of those planets which were not only close enough to Terro-Humans to look like them, but also to interbreed with them. (A question Burroughs never answered is: Just how could John Carter impregnate an egg-laying Dejorah Thoris? That's so ridiculous as to be comical, yet that's the story Burroughs gave us. John Carter and Dejorah Thoris have both a son and a daughter.) I'm pretty sure Burroughs wasn't the first to get "planet story" science fiction published... or what I prefer to call "science fantasy" since it's closer to fantasy than hard-SF. But he certainly did more to popularize planet stories than any other writer.

It's amazing how long the precedent set by the planet stories lingered on in SF. I just re-read Heinlein's FARMER IN THE SKY (1950) the other day, and there is a passing reference to Martians and Venusians, as natives of those planets. They were not specified to be near-human or humanoid, but were firmly enough in possession of those planets that Terrans were unable to colonize those worlds which were much more attractive than the Ganymede where Terrans wound up founding their first major colony, in that story. Even Isaac Asimov's juvenile DAVID STARR, SPACE RANGER (1952) included native Martians, altho in that story they are just a few very non-human survivors hidden beneath the surface of the planet, and remain unknown to even the humans who colonized Mars. (I won't point to THE MARTIAN CHRONICLES as a precedent. The various stories there are so wildly self-contradictory that I don't believe Bradbury intended it to be SF, but only social commentary.)

> One possibility is that Piper just liked the Martian origin for his story, and
> didn't care about possible implications for arguments about evolution.

Piper certainly did address the question of parallel evolution very directly in "When in the Course—". However, that remained unpublished, so arguably he didn't consider himself to be bound by what's in the story. But obviously Piper was strongly arguing in favor of parallel evolution in that story. When was it written? John Carr doesn't say in the intro to the story in the FEDERATION collection, but clearly it had to be before the publication of "Gunpowder God", the first of the Lord Kalvan stories, as it has many of the same elements. That story was pubbed in 1964.

Anyway, in When in the Course—", the idea of parallel evolution is discussed directly by the characters, and while serious rational objections to the concept are raised, the end of the story pretty firmly establishes that Piper was saying that yes, it did happen in that universe.

However, altho I side here with John Carr in arguing that "Genesis" suggests a Martian origin for Terro-Humans in the THFH, nonetheless, as I said, there are contradictory indications. In one THFH story there's a passing mention of a "scientific hoax" of Martian script found on a cave on Earth. Clearly the general public in the THFH doesn't believe they are related to Martians, let alone descended from them. I myself rationalize this away by saying this merely proves that scientific dogma exists in that universe, and the dogma rejects the idea that Martians and Terro-Humans have a common ancestry. Note that scientific dogma is very much a part of the story of "Omnilingual", so we can't simply ignore it. Each reader will have to decide for himself what the truth is; whether the Martians in "Omnilingual" were so very, very Terro-Human-like in every possible way, both anatomically and culturally, only by almost mathematically impossible random chance, or because they did share a common origin. Occam's Razor definitely shaves in the direction of a common origin, but of course no writer of fiction is bound by Occam's Razor!

David Sooby aka "Lensman"
2181
Dave EdenPerson was signed in when posted
04-07-2021
18:12 UT
John's comment of the Martian colonization of Terra brings something to mind. Does anyone have any insight on why Piper chose this idea for his world? It just strikes me as an odd choice for a scientifically informed atheist who was an adult at the time of the Scopes Monkey Trial. It could be seen as a concession to creationists, positing a situation where humans didn't evolve on earth ("look, Piper is hinting that he has doubts about men evolving from monkeys..."). One possibility is that Piper just liked the Martian origin for his story, and didn't care about possible implications for arguments about evolution.


Sorry if this has been discussed before and if so please
2180
CalidorePerson was signed in when posted
04-07-2021
16:42 UT
Some comments on a few recent posts.

1. Languages of the Freyans

I think David answered his own question in his original post. It’s the language of the “small and apparently unrelated patch [of civilization] at the northern corner of the continent.” (Federation, p. 206) When the Terrans don’t answer Rylla in Sosti, she realizes that they’re not native to the river-valley kingdoms. So she would naturally think they might be from that other civilization—the only other one she would know of—and try talking to them in that tongue.

“She spoke again—different intonation, probably different language.” (ibid., p. 215) This suggests that the other tongue Rylla speaks isn’t too different from Sosti. Otherwise the Terrans would be sure it’s another language. And that subtle difference is probably because the two languages are related. The Freyans’ ancestors came from the north, as evidenced by her castle’s architecture. “There was no window-glass, and the fireplaces had an unused look. Evidently it never got cold here.” (ibid., p. 223) Through cultural inertia, the Freyans still build fireplaces, even though they’re not needed; a remnant of the time when they dwelt farther north, in a colder climate where fireplaces were a necessity. And that locates the Freyans much closer to the ‘northern corner’ civilization, which they may well be an offshoot of.

The idea of a separate, priestly language is interesting, but unfortunately not supported by the story. “The language, they found, was called Sosti; it was spoken all over the river-valley system to which the Freyan civilization was confined…The civilization was an ancient one; the language was uniform, and the culture and economy unified.” (ibid., p. 229) A single, “uniform” civilizational language is also seen in the Lord Kalvan version, where the priests of Styphon simply speak Zarthani.

2. Ten Thousand Refugees from Abigor

While Piper was known to ‘inflate’ his figures at times (like his 700 and 650 light-year distances to Freya and Fenris, which are really 70 and 65), in this case his number is roughly correct. We know that Beam modeled the System States War on the American Civil War, and as I show in the Piper Atlas, the “ten thousand refugees from Abigor” have a historical model; the ten to twenty thousand Confederate refugees who refused to live under the victorious Union, and left the Southern States for Brazil.

While a base population of 10,000 is small, it’s actually much larger than the original base human population of Terra. In “Genesis”, we learn that Terra was colonized by only a handful of Martians. (I know, that’s from his Paratime series; but evidence in “Omnilingual” suggests he was using the same colonized-from-Mars premise in his Future History.) From that tiny group, it took about 100,000 years to achieve a planetary population of 3.5 billion (Terra in the mid-Twentieth Century); while the 10,000 refugees from Abigor take only 800 years to achieve 3.5 billion people spread out over 12 planets (the Sword-Worlds). (Space Viking, p. 10)

So it appears that Beam didn’t think much genetic variation was necessary in these processes. In fact, genetic variation is often the result, as the humans increase and spread, and adapt to these new planets. On Terra, the ‘Cro-Magnon’ Martians slowly evolve into the various ethnic and racial groups of modern Terra; while as noted by John Carr, the modern Terran expansion into space eventually causes “new species differentiation. On Agni, a hot-star planet…the inhabitants are said to be tough for Neo-barbarians, and to have very dark skin.” (Federation, pp. xxiii-xxiv)

3. Early Expansion of the Sword-Worlds

Why do the Sword-Worlders begin expanding after only two generations? I think partly it has to do with youthful dynamism. A new, young civilization, in an unknown region of space far from the Federation, would certainly be curious about the other stellar systems in its vicinity.

A second reason would be politics on Excalibur, starting with the “Development of loose feudalism from earlier and even looser town-meeting democracy.” (Piper Biography, p. 213) Every society has political divisions, and the Alliance refugees—originally united in their purpose—will be no exception. After Excalibur is firmly established as a town-meeting democracy, divisions would inevitably arise. And all it would take would be a single vote. An election is held on some important issue, and the majority vote wins. The voters who lost can either accept the results, or they can move.

But moving to another continent on Excalibur might not be far enough for these dissidents, because the government in Camelot would probably try to force them to obey its lawfully-voted rules. For by this time in the Future History, global states are the norm. The Federation contains almost 500 Planetary Member Republics, colonies and chartered companies, and the former System States were probably ruled from the habitable planet in each system. Similarly, Excalibur is likely established as a global state from its founding.

With space travel an easy option, however, the discontented citizens can go find their own planet. This would parallel the “irreconcilable minority-groups” mentioned in “Naudsonce”, who colonize planets “to get away from everybody else”. (Federation, p. 58)

That’s how some of the American colonies came to be. In 1636, Roger Williams was banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony for his religious views, so he founded what became the colony and state of Rhode Island. And in contrast to Puritan New England, the colony of Maryland was founded to provide a haven for England’s Catholic minority, who were persecuted by the majority Protestants.

Aside from the urge to explore or losing a vote, a third way Joyeuse and Flamberge and Durendal could be settled would be through violence. All the Sword-Worlders are armed (Space Viking, p. 149), and disputes in general often end in fighting. When the dust clears, the losers are either dead; imprisoned or driven out. On Fenris, “Half the little settlements on the other islands and on the mainland had started when some group or family moved out of Port Sandor because of the enmity of some larger and more powerful group or family, and half our shootings and knife fights grew out of grudges between families or hunting crews.” (Four-Day Planet, p. 49)

With three planets and three reasons, perhaps we can just split the difference. Joyeuse is settled by explorers, Durendal by a peaceful but irreconcilable minority-group, and Flamberge by outright rebels.

Consider too that this situation would only get worse over time. As town-meeting democracy slowly gives way to feudalism, those in charge would quite literally begin ‘lording it’ over the people. And feudalism is an inherently military system. If you don’t like the way your liege-lord is running things, you can either grit your teeth and accept it, revolt against it (as on Gram), or emigrate. And for those who leave, there’s still plenty of room to set up their own societies. For even after eight centuries of expansion across twelve planets, Lucas Trask says “There’s still too much free land and free opportunity in the Sword-Worlds…Nobody does much bowing and scraping to the class above him; he’s too busy trying to shove himself up into it.” (Space Viking, p. 148)

In this future feudalism, everybody wants to be a lord, and some of the Sword-Worlders who leave set up their own lordships in the Old Federation—the Viking base planets. Including Prince Viktor of Xochitl (nominally allegiant to King Konrad of Haulteclere) and Prince Trask of Tanith (nominally allegiant to King Angus of Gram). It is predicted that Tanith will “be another Sword-World in forty or fifty years”, and Prince Trask becomes King Lucas by the end of Space Viking; while Prince Viktor may become the next King of Gram. (ibid., pp. 11, 242, 243)

John
2179
David SoobyPerson was signed in when posted
04-04-2021
06:07 UT
I recall being surprised, some months ago, to stumble across a reference to Marduk as being a Babylonian god. Well, I shouldn't have been surprised that it wasn't a name Piper just made up, as it's made very clear in the THFH stories that planets were, by preference, named for gods of various pantheons.

One thing we should keep in mind is that in Judeo-Christian mythology, or more specifically in Jewish tradition, the names of gods of foreign countries were often re-cast in the role of demons and devils. So it shouldn't be surprising if names such as Lucifer and Beelzebub are to be found as planetary names... altho the latter would perhaps be closer to the original source if it was Baal or Ba'al.

And let's not single out Jewish tradition for that, either. The Roman Catholic church tended to "adopt" local gods from countries conquered by Christians, re-casting them either as pseudo-Catholic saints or as demons.

Did Piper consciously take into consideration this trend of Jewish tradition recasting names of gods of foreign countries as demons or devils? I don't know, but it would not at all surprise me if he did.

What were Piper's personal views on religion? Stories like "Gunpowder God" and "Temple Trouble" seem to suggest he regarded formal religion as more of a con game than anything else, with few True Believers among the priesthood. If Piper's intent was a subtly satirical treatment of formal religion, then perhaps including names of gods which Jewish (and therefore Christian) tradition regarded as demons or devils, might have been part of that.

The latter is, of course, pure and utter speculation on my part, and I won't suggest it's anything supported by Piper's writings.

David Sooby AKA "Lensman"
2178
Jon CrockerPerson was signed in when posted
04-04-2021
02:31 UT
Ah, yes, thank you - I'd forgotten the Amaterasu and Marduk references!

You're probably right, if I had to bet I'd say that Piper put them in to show a more secular age in the future, unburdened by the superstitions of the past - but when I wrote that I'd forgotten the two worlds above. It would be a bad pun to say I suspected something more devilish afoot, so I won't.

Perhaps for the capital ships, it was "fierce face" naming. After all, who in their right mind wants to fight a dragon? Some of the others wouldn't seem so 'terrible' to modern readers,
2177
David "PiperFan" JohnsonPerson was signed in when posted
04-03-2021
17:21 UT
~
Jon Crocker wrote:

> I'm doing some research on what little we know about the
> worlds of the Systems States Alliance.
>
> They all seem to be named for the leading demons of hell.

Perhaps this is what you meant but I think it's more accurate to say that many of them seem to be named from traditional Judaeo-Christian sources (which, by the time these worlds were being named, was likely considered to be "mythology").

Not all of the Alliance worlds were named in this manner though. Consider this comment from Zareff: "It took over a year to move a million and a half troops from Ashmodai to Marduk, and the fleet that was based on Amaterasu was blasted out of existence in the spaceports and in orbit." Both Marduk and Amaterasu would seem to have been Alliance worlds but neither name comes from a Judaeo-Christian tradition.

> The signature, "Remember Ashmodai! Remember Belphegor!"

That Alliance battle cry is my invention but both are identified by Beam as Alliance worlds. Ashmodai, besides being the world from which those troops were moved to Marduk, was Zareff's homeworld which was destroyed by the Federation in 851 A.E. Belphegor and Baphomet--another Judaeo-Christian traditional reference--were also destroyed by the Federation.

> Was Piper sending a message with those names, 'these
> were the bad guys'? Or was he imagining a very contrary
> ship captain making a series of discoveries of planets,
> after all the Norse names had been used?

One of the things Beam was showing, I think, was that it was getting more and more difficult in the later Federation era--when many of the worlds which eventually seceded to form the Alliance were originally settled--to name new worlds from traditional mythological sources. Thus, you have all the Cabell-sourced planet names in the Gartner Trisystem, including Poictesme itself. But Beam was showing this in other ways too with planet names--not just in Graveyard of Dreams / ~Junkyard Planet~--from a variety of ancient Levant region mythological sources (e.g. Anath, Behemoth, Chermosh, Dagon, Lugaluru, Melkarth, Nergal and Rimmon) and other literary references (e.g. Hiawatha, Malebolge, Moruna and Obidicut)

I wonder if Ashmodai and Belphegor and Baphomet were simply meant as allusions to "hell" which served Beam's dramatic purpose because they were destroyed by the Federation rather than being specifically related to the circumstances of their naming when they were founded. But Beam also seemed to be up to ~something~ with the Alliance.

Zareff, who uses "Gehenna" as a curse (a practice which re-occurs among the Alliance-descended Sword-Worlders--who also use "Satan"), named his gunboats "for capital ships of the old System States Navy." They're all monsters: ~Banshee~, ~Dero~, ~Dragon~, ~Goblin~, ~Poltergeist~, ~Werewolf~, ~Vampire~ and ~Zombi~ (four gunboats, I think, are unnamed), which gives us some sort of insight into the Alliance navy, at least.

> Others have probably noticed this before, but I just
> found this out and I admit a degree of surprise.

I suspect many of the Judaeo-Christian references would have been more familiar to Beam's audience at the time he was writing than they are to contemporary readers today. That leads me to suspect that rather than signalling that the Alliance--and their Sword-Worlds descendants--were the "bad guys," Beam was doing something similar to what he'd done with Nazi-descendant Carlos von Schlichten and Vichy-descendant Paula Quinton. He was showing that some of the negative connotations which were taken for granted among his contemporary readers would fade / evolve over a future history spanning centuries.

Remember Ashmodai! Remember Belphegor!

David
--
The first extrasolar planets, as they had been discovered, had been named from Norse mythology--Odin and Baldur and Thor, Uller and Freya, Bifrost and Asgard and Niflheim. When the Norse names ran out, the discoverers had turned to other mythologies, Celtic and Egyptian and Hindu and Assyrian, and by the middle of the Seventh Century they were naming planets for almost anything." -- H. Beam Piper, "Graveyard of Dreams"
~
2176
Jon CrockerPerson was signed in when posted
04-03-2021
06:57 UT
I'm doing some research on what little we know about the worlds of the Systems States Alliance.

They all seem to be named for the leading demons of hell.

In the first meeting in Kurt Fawzi's office, Colonel Zaref was lamenting about wartime security. "I remember, once, on Mephistopheles..." Mephistopheles was the demon 'from German folklore' wikipedia says and, his agent got him a gig in Doctor Faust.

The signature, "Remember Ashmodai! Remember Belphegor!" Both demons. Ashmodai is one of the many forms of Asmodeus, a prince of hell. Belphegor is another prince of hell.

Abigor, the world that those ten thousand folks took what was left of the SSA fleet and left from, is named after a 'great duke' of hell, who commanded 60 legions of demons, don't you know.

I admit I am not sufficiently up on my christian demonology and so I never recognized the names. I don't know if any had a guest spot on Supernatural, either.

Was Piper sending a message with those names, 'these were the bad guys'? Or was he imagining a very contrary ship captain making a series of discoveries of planets, after all the Norse names had been used?

Others have probably noticed this before, but I just found this out and I admit a degree of surprise.
2175
David "PiperFan" JohnsonPerson was signed in when posted
03-27-2021
03:22 UT
~
Tim Tow wrote:

> Regarding the 10,000 refugees who founded the Sword
> Worlds. Perhaps that was a figurative 10,000 when the
> number was much higher.

Agreed it's a "round number" and perhaps actually may have been as many as nearly 20,000, but I doubt it was 50,000 and--unless there was a typo--it certainly wasn't 100,000.

Remember Ashmodai! Remember Bephegor!

David
--
"We talk glibly about ten to the hundredth power, but emotionally we still count, 'One, Two, Three, Many.'" - Otto Harkaman (H. Beam Piper), ~Space Viking~
~
2174
Tim TowPerson was signed in when posted
03-26-2021
15:47 UT
Regarding the 10,000 refugees who founded the Sword Worlds. Perhaps that was a figurative 10,000 when the number was much higher. 10,000 might be reflective of that minimum genetic diversity requirement or an allusion to the song 10,000 men of Harvard.
2173
Tim TowPerson was signed in when posted
03-26-2021
13:16 UT
Just read the latest anthology of stories by Ken Liu, The Hidden Girl and Other stories. The penultimate story in the collection, The Message, is thematically similar to Omnilingual with its own spin on it. Originally published in 2012 in Interzone, http://ttapress.com/1397/interzone-242/. He's one of the contemporary writers that I will buy his books in hardcover these days.

Omnilingual was often reprinted in many of the secondary school science fiction texts so wouldn't be surprising if it had influenced other works. Anyone recall others about using this idea?
2172
David "PiperFan" JohnsonPerson was signed in when posted
03-24-2021
04:49 UT
~
"There was no calendar in sight, and he could find no newspapers or dated periodicals, but he knew that it was prior to July 18, 1946. On that day, his fourteenth birthday, his father had given him a light .22 rifle, and it had been hung on a pair of rustic forks on the wall. It was not there now, nor ever had been. On the table, he saw a boys' book of military aircraft, with a clean, new dustjacket; the flyleaf was inscribed: To Allan Hartley, from his father, on his thirteenth birthday, 7/18 '45. Glancing out the window at the foliage on the trees, he estimated the date at late July or early August, 1945; that would make him just thirteen." - H Beam Piper, "Time and Time Again"

It's March 23rd. Happy birthday, Beam.

Cheers,

David
--
"In my 'teens . . . I decided that what I really wanted to do was write; I wasn't quite sure what, but I was going to write something. About the same time, I became aware of science fiction, such as it was then, mostly H.G. Wells, and fantasy, Bram Stoker, H. Rider Haggard, and then I began reading newer science (more or less) fiction--Burroughs, Merritt, Ralph Milne Farley, Ray Cummings, _et_al_. This was the Neolithic, or Hugo Gernsback Period of science fiction, and by this time I was a real 200-proof fan." - H. Beam Piper, "Double: Bill Symposium" interview
~
Edited 03-24-2021 04:51
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