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Welcome to the H. Beam Piper mailing list and discussion forum. Initiated in October 2008 (after the demise of the original PIPER-L mailing list), this tool for shared communication among Piper fans provides an e-mail list and a discussion forum with on-line archives.
 
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^     All messages            1943-1958 of 1958  1927-1942 >>
1958
Jon CrockerPerson was signed in when posted
02-11-2019
01:11 UT
Best of luck getting that resolved, John!
1957
jimmyjoejanglesPerson was signed in when posted
02-10-2019
03:25 UT
I think you should try to get them on the phone. I had issues with Audible and the email system they had in place but was able to get them on the phone and easily resolved the issue. Audible is owned by Amazon. Are there any plans for an audio version?
1956
Lord KalvanPerson was signed in when posted
02-09-2019
20:44 UT
PARATIME POLICE CHRONICLES UPDATE

A case of bureaucratic idiocy: I’ve had a run in with the powers that be at Amazon over my latest book, The Paratime Police Chronicles, Volume I. You wanna talk about a Kafkaesque nightmare…

Because there’s a PDF book listed on Amazon with the title The Paratime Police, the Amazon digital police are convinced that I’m ripping it off, even though my book contains 4 brand new stories that have never appeared anywhere. The problem is when I tried to explain all this, all I got was a computer generated reply. I don’t believe a real persona every gets involved with Amazon; in fact, I read an article in "Fortune" magazine about a vendor who was attacked by a competitor. What the attack amounted to, was this other seller (who sells the same product) bought a bunch of phony reviews from the Five Dollar Funnel Review, which set-off one of Amazon’s alarms and they shut the poor bastard down, almost putting him out of business!

The problem he ran into the same problem that I did; he was unable to get a hold of a real person to resolve his problem. He did some research and found a woman who knows some “real” Amazon management people and paid her a few hundred dollars to put him in touch with one so he could explain his problem and get it resolved. So after about 6 iterations of dealing with the automated system—-as I tried to explain that my work was not the same as the Paratime Police title-—I was told if I didn’t take down the offending (still unpublished) Kindle book my account would be frozen.

Since Amazon Kindle provides a big part of my book income, I took it right down. I don’t have time to find the negotiator he used or the extra bucks to pay what amounts to extortion! I had my graphics person retitle it and do the same with the interior PDF file. The new title is Paratime Parasites, which is the title of one of my original stories and has more zing as well. Sigh. Not to bore all of you with my problems, but this is the kind of idiocy independent authors have to go through these days….

I just finished re-submitting the book to my publisher under the title, "Paratime Parasites," and after it shows up on Amazon in a week or so. Then, I'll try to put up the e-book -- if they'll let me? Copies under the original title are still available at Hostigos.com in hardcover and in both e-book formats.

John
1955
David "PiperFan" JohnsonPerson was signed in when posted
02-09-2019
18:56 UT
~
The Paratime Police Chronicles, Volume II

Finished John's new anthology and have posted a review here:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-reviews/R3V1CRS0PIMGEF

Get your copy now!

David
--
"In my 'teens, which would have been the early '20's, I decided that what I really wanted to do was write; I wasn't quite sure what, but I was going to write something. About the same time, I became aware of science fiction, such as it was then, mostly H.G. Wells, and fantasy, Bram Stoker, H. Rider Haggard, and then I began reading newer science (more or less) fiction--Burroughs, Merritt, Ralph Milne Farley, Ray Cummings, _et_al_. This was the Neolithic, or Hugo Gernsback Period of science fiction, and by this time I was a real 200-proof fan." - H. Beam Piper, "Double: Bill Symposium" interview
~
1954
David "PiperFan" JohnsonPerson was signed in when posted
02-09-2019
03:48 UT
~
"But we Sword-Worlders got around the galaxy, for a while. In fact, I seem to remember reading that some of our brethren from Morglay or Flamberge even occupied Aditya for a couple of centuries. Not that you'd guess it to look at Aditya now."


That's Lord Marshall Koreff, the power behind the Durendal throne, speaking to Paul XXII in "Ministry of Disturbance." He's taking a not-so-veiled shot at the Adityan representatives competing with him and his puppet-King for the Emperor's attention.

Koreff might not know, but we recognize this is an ironic statement, for though it's true that Aditya was "occupied" by Space Vikings at an earlier period in its history, in between that point and Koreff's attempted barb the Adityans managed to overthrow their Viking overlords, who had become decadent and weak, as recounted in Beam's "A Slave is a Slave." Sword-Worlders may have conquered Aditya but _these_ Adityans are the descendants of those who massacred the descendants of the Space Vikings and supplanted their rule.

This is Beam at his best, showing us with his own future history that yesterday's victors are tomorrow's vanquished, and that this cycle will repeat itself again and again (to the point where both Koreff and the Adityan rulers both find themselves to be subjects of the Galactic Empire).

"Save Your Majesty!"

David
--
"Good things in the long run are often tough while they're happening." - Otto Harkaman (H. Beam Piper), ~Space Viking~
~
1953
David "PiperFan" JohnsonPerson was signed in when posted
01-27-2019
23:35 UT
~
Dave Eden wrote:

> But outside the Fuzzies in the Terro-Human future, my
> favourite is probably Four-Day Planet.

Yeah, that's a good one. Being a "juvenile" it's a good entry point for younger readers too.

> I think I've read all the Paratime stories except Kalvan,
> which I'm in the middle of. I really liked Gunpowder God, so
> I imagine I'll feel the same way about Kalvan after I finish
> reading the complete, extended dance mix version of
> Gunpowder God.

How cool that the ~Lord Kalvan~ experience is so new for you! It's one of Beam's best novels.

> Among the others: Murder in the Gunroom. It is so vivid, I
> feel like I'm there in the countryside and towns, getting
> rained on and following Jeff Rand around.

There are some wonderful yarns among Beam's non-Paratime and non-Terro-human Future History work . . . and there are some real clunkers. Thing is many of us come down in very different places here.

> I only know one other Piper fan, through Twitter, and I
> think he's older than me.

Well now you know many others! ;)

> I'm thinking more of the mundane details of maintenance
> shops, etc. The nature of the tools and equipment would
> change, but Piper is projecting an imagined future where
> industrial workshops have a similar feel.

Yep. Seems Beam put all that time spent wandering around the rail-yards at night to good use!

Cheers,

David
--
"Ideas for science fiction stories like ideas for anything else, are where you find them, usually in the most unlikely places. The only reliable source is a mind which asks itself a question like, 'What would happen if--?' or, 'Now what would this develop into, in a few centuries?' Or, 'How would so-and-so happen?' Anything at all, can trigger such a question, in your field if not in mine." - H. Beam Piper, "Double: Bill Symposium" interview
~
1952
Dave EdenPerson was signed in when posted
01-22-2019
01:46 UT
Thank you for the welcomes, everyone.

> So, what's your favorite Terro-human Future History yarn, now? Favorite Paratime yarn? Favorite from the rest?

The first Fuzzy book, hands down. But outside the Fuzzies in the Terro-Human future, my favourite is probably Four-Day Planet. I think I've read all the Paratime stories except Kalvan, which I'm in the middle of. I really liked Gunpowder God, so I imagine I'll feel the same way about Kalvan after I finish reading the complete, extended dance mix version of Gunpowder God. Among the others: Murder in the Gunroom. It is so vivid, I feel like I'm there in the countryside and towns, getting rained on and following Jeff Rand around.


> We've talked about this a bit here before (except for the tone--I love that insight). These days, it's one of the things that makes > his settings seem "alien" to contemporary readers. It's the same sort of reason why Matthew Weiner described ~Mad Men~ as
> "science-fiction."

That's very interesting. I didn't know that some contemporary readers thought that, but I haven't met any contemporary readers other than my son who has read the Fuzzy books. I only know one other Piper fan, through Twitter, and I think he's older than me.


> You're right that this sort of detail makes for good writing, but isn't this sort of thing in say, those scenes in Port Carpenter on > Koshchei, part of what makes some of Beam's work seem "old fashioned" these days? All those conveyor belts and spools of wire and
> aerial antennas. . . . Wonderful, concrete detail but not what I imagine a future automated factory would like. (Ghu, not even what > one looks like today, more than half a century into Beam's future.)

Indeed, Port Carpenter and Koschei are part of what I had in mind. Yes, it's true that some details seem "old fashioned". Tapes are for recordings are another good example. I'm thinking more of the mundane details of maintenance shops, etc. The nature of the tools and equipment would change, but Piper is projecting an imagined future where industrial workshops have a similar feel. Of course we don't know how accurate this will end up being, but I really like the way it "looks" in his stories.
1951
Jon CrockerPerson was signed in when posted
01-19-2019
16:57 UT
Welcome Dave!
1950
David "PiperFan" JohnsonPerson was signed in when posted
01-19-2019
05:17 UT
~
Dave Eden wrote:

> Hello everyone, just joining the forum.

Welcome, Dave. Always good to "e-meet" a new Piper fan.

> I've been a Piper fan since I was a teenager in the late 80s,
> when working at a book store I noticed an interesting slim
> volume on the shelf with a cute fuzzy creature and a tough
> looking gentleman with a white moustache.

That Michael Whelan; his cover illustrations brought so many folks to Beam's work!

> I stayed just a Fuzzy fan until recently. I had re-read the
> Fuzzy series a few times over the years and thoroughly
> enjoyed it, but never got around to Piper's other work.
> Now that I have, I'm hooked, and am systematically
> reading his entire corpus.

So, what's your favorite Terro-human Future History yarn, now? Favorite Paratime yarn? Favorite from the rest?

> I particularly enjoyed John Carr's biography as well.

John efforts to share parts of Beam's writing and life have been a wonderful gift.

> I like "ground based" sci-fi, written from the perspective
> of someone who knows and enjoys hiking, camping and
> hunting. Piper does that very well, and this is perhaps why
> his work "ages" well.

That's an interesting point, that is obvious now that you mention it but never seemed to occur to me before. It's there in the Fuzzy yarns, obviously, but also in yarns like "Naudsonce" and "Omnilingual." "Police Operation" and "Temple Trouble" too.

(And, I've just realized, in my own "The Satchel" and "Grandfather Encounter," though, being a city-kid, likely not nearly as well done as by Beam.)

> I also love how Piper, immersed as we all are in the
> culture of his day, projects a future where everyone
> smokes, cocktail hour is an unchanging sacred rite, and
> everyone speaks with the mature tone you only hear
> in classic movies.

We've talked about this a bit here before (except for the tone--I love that insight). These days, it's one of the things that makes his settings seem "alien" to contemporary readers. It's the same sort of reason why Matthew Weiner described ~Mad Men~ as "science-fiction."

> Another detail I really enjoy is how he describes
> industrial environments, something he knew at least
> as well as the Pennsylvania countryside. The details
> about workshops and warehouses, I don't recall seeing
> that anywhere else, and it really helps bring his settings
> to life.

You're right that this sort of detail makes for good writing, but isn't this sort of thing in say, those scenes in Port Carpenter on Koshchei, part of what makes some of Beam's work seem "old fashioned" these days? All those conveyor belts and spools of wire and aerial antennas. . . . Wonderful, concrete detail but not what I imagine a future automated factory would like. (Ghu, not even what one looks like today, more than half a century into Beam's future.)

> Lastly, I love how he works in his knowledge and
> appreciation of firearms, in a way that satisfies fellow
> connoisseurs but doesn't intrude on the story.

With something as simple as a "Mars Consolidated" pistol Beam showed his storytelling mastery, telling us something about the settlement of the Solar system and the economy of the early (first) Federation with with just a couple of words. . . .

Thanks for sharing a bit of what you find interesting in Beam's work.

Cheers,

David
--
"Let's see yours. Draw--soul! Inspection--soul!" - Foxx Travis (H. Beam Piper), "Oomphel in the Sky"
~
1949
Lord KalvanPerson was signed in when posted
01-19-2019
03:45 UT
David, welcome to the Piper mailing list. In answer to your question, this years Irregular's Muster will be held on Saturday, May 18, 2019. We will be meeting at the Waffle Shop on North Atherton at 10:00 a.m. All Piper fans are welcome. I will be there along with Dennis Frank, our guide. This year we will be visiting some of the sites mentioned in Great Kings' War, as well as the usual Piper sites.

John Carr
1948
Lord KalvanPerson was signed in when posted
01-18-2019
20:58 UT

The new "Paratime Police Chronicles" hardcover is now available from the Hostigos.com website and Amazon. For some reason, I'm having trouble putting up the e-book on Kindle -- Sigh. However, as of today, the e-books (mobi and e-put) editions are available at the Shop at Hostigos.com.

John
1947
jimmyjoejanglesPerson was signed in when posted
01-18-2019
20:25 UT
Welcome aboard.
1946
Dave EdenPerson was signed in when posted
01-18-2019
17:00 UT
If someone can please share the date of this year's Irregulars' Muster, I'd greatly appreciate it. I'd love to attend, and I'll probably need to book a day or two off work and would like some lead time. Thank you.
1945
Dave EdenPerson was signed in when posted
01-18-2019
17:00 UT
Hello everyone, just joining the forum. I've been a Piper fan since I was a teenager in the late 80s, when working at a book store I noticed an interesting slim volume on the shelf with a cute fuzzy creature and a tough looking gentleman with a white moustache.

I stayed just a Fuzzy fan until recently. I had re-read the Fuzzy series a few times over the years and thoroughly enjoyed it, but never got around to Piper's other work. Now that I have, I'm hooked, and am systematically reading his entire corpus. I particularly enjoyed John Carr's biography as well.

What do I like about Piper? More generally, his writing is direct and readable, but not dumbed down. In terms of specifics, I'll try to summarize a few. I like "ground based" sci-fi, written from the perspective of someone who knows and enjoys hiking, camping and hunting. Piper does that very well, and this is perhaps why his work "ages" well. Conceptions of starship combat may not survive as well over the decades (although I suspect David Weber's Honorverse will fare pretty well, but that's another topic). I also love how Piper, immersed as we all are in the culture of his day, projects a future where everyone smokes, cocktail hour is an unchanging sacred rite, and everyone speaks with the mature tone you only hear in classic movies. Another detail I really enjoy is how he describes industrial environments, something he knew at least as well as the Pennsylvania countryside. The details about workshops and warehouses, I don't recall seeing that anywhere else, and it really helps bring his settings to life. Lastly, I love how he works in his knowledge and appreciation of firearms, in a way that satisfies fellow connoisseurs but doesn't intrude on the story.

I look forward to discussing Piper with you all.
1944
David "PiperFan" JohnsonPerson was signed in when posted
01-17-2019
02:32 UT
~
~The Paratime Police Chronicles~

I've just received the latest Paratime book, John Carr's new anthology, which includes three of Beam's Paratime Police yarns and four new Paratime yarns by John, along with an introductory essay by Eric Fisher.

It's a beautiful book with a dust jacket by artist Sean Bodley, a newcomer to Piper's work:

https://seanbodley.com/about/

You can get your copy at Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Paratime-Police-Chr...-Vol/dp/0937912727/

And perhaps the very best part is that this is "Volume 1," with another book, which will include Beam's Piper novellas and more Kalvan work from John, on its way soon.

Down Styphon!

David
--
"Why, you--You parapeeper!" -- Morvan Kara (H. Beam Piper), "Police Operation"
~
1943
Jon CrockerPerson was signed in when posted
12-27-2018
03:40 UT
Some electrons bearing gifts are en route. Happy Boxing Day.
^     All messages            1943-1958 of 1958  1927-1942 >>

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