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The geometry of ROC space

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2016123yuanyuan
01-22-2016
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08-16-2008
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John Doe
11-07-2007
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4
Ben Laxton
10-06-2005
03:28 PM ET (US)
To follow up on Anup's remark, does the ROC space provide a clear advantage to the f-measure or metircs used for decision tree splitting - i.e. does the unification of these different metrics give more insight? Also, has this been used in some application that would make its strengths apparent?
3
Anup Doshi
10-06-2005
02:47 PM ET (US)
It's very interesting that they are able to unify several different metrics through the 3D ROC. But I don't think it is anything more than a theoretical exercise. If the metrics generally used for your sub-field/problem work well enough, why would you bother trying to extrapolate metrics that are consistent over a whole bunch of fields?
2
Erik Murphy-Chutorian
10-06-2005
02:37 PM ET (US)
I found this to be a good review of ROC curves, covering a few of the less-common performance measures. It would be interesting to know more of the logic behind choosing one metric over another.
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