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Session 9

6
Deleted by topic administrator 07-22-2006 09:28 AM
5
Alan Hopewell
06-18-2005
09:30 PM ET (US)
Joshua:

I need to check this posting more often, and apologize for the
delay. Email me at a.hopewell@charter.net and/ or give me your email so that I may reply. I have a substantial review I can
send to you. I anticipate being assigned to the 4th ID at Ft.
Hoos when they return to Iraq this summer, and continuing this
research, so perhaps we can collaborate. Hope your uncle is OK,
and best of luck.

Let me know if you get this.
--


In remembrance of D - Day:

The most difficult assignment of the entire Normandy invasion was given to LTC (later MG) James Earl Rudder: to assault and to destroy (in a pre-emptive strike) the massive guns overlooking the invasion fleet high atop Pointe du Hoc which could have mangled much of the fleet at Omaha Beach. After dodging bullets and grenades to climb the massive cliff and after three days of bitter fighting, only 90 of the 225 men of Rudder's 2nd Ranger Battalion were still standing, with Rudder himself wounded several times. Upon taking the cliff, the Rangers found that the actual guns had been disassembled and moved some distance away due to the impending assault. Thanks to Providence, no imbedded reporters from the New York Times were present, which likely would have provoked months of repetitive columns about "we had faulty intelligence, so we should not have attacked; Eisenhower lied, so men died," etc. Rangers soon located the guns, which could have fired from the new positions, and disabled them with thermite grenades. For three years I had the privilege of living literally across the street from MG Rudder's residence as my President at Texas A&M, and his Distinguished Service Cross and 21 other medals still gleam on the wall dedicated to him in the Rudder Tower.


C. Alan Hopewell, Ph.D., M.S. Psypharm, ABPP
Diplomate, American Board of Clinical Neuropsychology
Master's Degree in Clinical Psychopharmacology
Major, MSC, USAR, 1971 - 1990
4
Alan Hopewell
06-18-2005
08:55 PM ET (US)
Joshua:

I need to check this posting more often, and apologize for the delay. Email me at a.hopewell@charter.net and/ or give me your email so that I may reply. I have a substantial review I can send to you. I anticipate being assigned to the 4th ID at Ft. Hood when they return to Iraq this summer, and continuing this research, so perhaps we can collaborate. Hope your uncle is OK, and best of luck.
Edited 06-18-2005 08:56 PM
3
Joshua
06-16-2005
08:42 PM ET (US)
Greetings Sir,

I am Navy veteran (1995-1999) primarily stationed in Yokosuka, Japan during that time. Currently, I am finishing a degree in Psychology in San Diego,CA. I'm presently engaged in doing work for a research project about the prevalence of returning Vietnam Veteran's diagnosed (or perhaps overlooked) as suffering from PTSD. I am very interested in statistical information, VA treatment programs available, # of Veteran's who have sought treatment etc.

My interest is not purely academic as I have an uncle who served during Vietnam and briefly suffered from the onset of PTSD after his ship suffered massive explosions and fires. (USS Enterprise)

Any help you could provide would be greatly appreciated.

Very Respectfully,
Joshua Boylan
2
Alan Hopewell
08-11-2004
11:09 AM ET (US)
Test message for bulletin. Thanks to everyone for participating in the session.
1
Stephen ShermanPerson was signed in when posted
04-21-2004
09:17 AM ET (US)
I welcome your comments to this session where we will discuss PTSD, Agent Orange, Race relations and other related topics. To return to the Session Page go to http://www.viet-myths.net/Session09.htm

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