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U. S. Postal Service Rural Carrier Employees

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12469
leavingPerson was signed in when posted
03-21-2017
11:31 PM ET (US)
/m12465 + 12468 -- Mlamb -- "My problem is that I run my 23 hour evaluation aux route in 19 hours. "

-- Be like a city carrier and use all those 23 hours a week on your own route.

-- Per page 49 of the new contract: After completion of the assigned auxiliary route or the primary route assignment, a leave replacement assigned to serve the auxiliary route may be utilized on any other auxiliary route, or serve as a leave replacement or provide auxiliary assistance on any regular route. You can thank the new contract and the NRLCA negotiating team for you predicament ( loosing $ ) because previously Aux carriers were very limited on how they could be used after running their route, now the flood gates are wide open.

"I brought it up to my postmaster about the loss and was told oh well."

-- That shows how much manglement actually cares for their carriers. Getting the USPS "free work" makes manglement look good to higher ups.

-- Go over those pay stubs again regarding being paid hourly for your AUX route. Might want to have the Assistant District Representative double check the figures.

-- Have any of the regular carriers without subs submitted the 120-Day Notice to get a sub? Not much manglement will do hire more subs until those 120-Day Notices start to pile up.
12468
Mlamb
03-21-2017
06:40 PM ET (US)
I work the aux but our office is short handed so I work about 30 hours on other routes all week. So between that and my hours on my aux, I am at about 50 hours a week. So I was told that I lose evaluation after 40 hours of actual work. Which causes me to receive the actual time I run the aux in. Which is about 4 less hours a week.
12467
RCfromMS
03-21-2017
06:07 PM ET (US)
mlamb, if you are on a green card then you have not be assigned to the aux route. Check your form 50. They should have submitted on when you accepted the aux route. During Christmas OT period you ARE paid actual hours; paid daily evaluation rest of the year.

Ask to see the 1314 or 1314A and see if you are paid on that instead of green card (codes A998 or A999 will appear on your pay stub if you are paid on green card)

Anyway, they should have your work on the 1314 or 1314A and the number of trips for EMA
12466
RCfromMS
03-21-2017
05:57 PM ET (US)
F 21 581.22 Qualifying Period
A qualifying period of 90 days of continuous service is required for a regular
route. A break in service of 1 or more workdays breaks continuity of
employment, and the replacement carrier must begin a new 90-day
qualifying period. Normally, a break in service will occur only when the
regular carrier returns or the vacant route is filled by the appointment of a
new regular carrier. A break in service does not mean absence on the route
due to a nonscheduled workday or approved leave, including LWOP, or
when management requires the carrier to work on another assignment.
12465
Mlamb
03-21-2017
04:16 PM ET (US)
Thanks. My union steward said that they have to file paperwork from my office when I hit my 90 days. So I wasn't sure how that worked. Another issue I have is, I am on overtime every week. I have been noticing that I am getting paid hourly for my aux route instead of the evaluation. When I asked my postmaster, I was told that even though it is my route, the green card pushes me over 40 and I switch to hourly. My problem is that I run my 23 hour evaulation aux route in 19 hours. So I lose about 4 hours a week. I brought it up to my postmaster about the loss and was told oh well. Should I be getting my evaluation or am I just gonna have to count it as a loss? My supervisors expect me to be done early because I usually have to help on 2 other routes.
12464
leavingPerson was signed in when posted
03-21-2017
03:15 PM ET (US)
/m12462 -- Mlamb -- "do I earn vacation based off of only the hours on my aux route or the total hours I work? "

-- From the ELM, Chapter 5, Section 512.56 -- Auxiliary rural carriers earn leave based on the number of hours worked and in accordance with the appropriated leave category. Leave is credited as earned. These carriers are granted leave in increments of 1 hour.

-- You would have hit the 90-day mark on 17 March.

-- Never have heard that FLMA restarts the 90-day period. A call to the Assistant District Representative or Shared Services in NC may shed some light on it. Not sure what paperwork you talked about. The pay center at Eagan would note the 90-day period.
12463
leavingPerson was signed in when posted
03-21-2017
02:55 PM ET (US)
/m12461 -- MikeCr. -- ". My dues are subtracted from my check, do you not recommend that?"

-- Too late! Now if you want out of the union, there is a very small window to apply. Also there is paperwork to be done.
12462
Mlamb
03-21-2017
10:34 AM ET (US)
So I took an aux route on December 17, 2016. I was sick on Feb 3 and 4. I had to take fmla for 2 weeks from Mar 1-14. Did I hit my 90 days on Mar 17? I was told by my postmaster that my fmla restarted my 90 days (when I start to earn vacation). So do I have to wait 90 more days? Also do they submit paperwork or do I for the 90 days? Another thing, do I earn vacation based off of only the hours on my aux route or the total hours I work? I work 23 hours a weeks on the aux and between 20 and 40 hours on my green card.
12461
MikeCr.
03-21-2017
09:52 AM ET (US)
I signed up for the union back in orientation. Even though I knew it wouldn't matter too much until after the 90 days worked or 1 year. My dues are subtracted from my check, do you not recommend that? Thank you for the information.
12460
leavingPerson was signed in when posted
03-20-2017
10:23 PM ET (US)
/m12459 -- MikeCr. -- "Is this contract readable online?"

-- you don't have to be a union member to get info off the NRLCA home page. To look behind the curtain, you will have to join. If you do, I'd suggest paying dues by check or cash. If you want out of the union, just stop paying annual dues.

-- yes -- you can find it at www.nrlca.org / scroll down the page to find the 2015-2018 contract on the right side of the page. Click on it. Better to save it to your computer so you can refer to it later. While you are on the home page, go across to the left side of the page to find your steward. Just need to enter your Zip Code.
12459
MikeCr.
03-20-2017
09:46 PM ET (US)
-- Congrats on completing your probationary period. Management probably didn't notice, so don't make a fuss about it.
   
    Thank you!

-- Having completed your probationary period, you are eligible to transfer to another post office. The big requirement to transfer is there must be an RCA vacancy at the office you want to transfer to. ( and it sounds like that would be a good idea based on your storm experience. ) Page 48 of the current contract has the details. One detail not spelled out in the contract is if you are accepted at the new office, the old office has 30 days to release you after notification by the new post office.
    
     Again, thank you. Is this contract readable online?

-- I'd get a hold of the ADR and go over the details of the threat to be declared AWOL during storm conditions, especially if you called the USPS National Employee Emergency Hotline ( 1-888-363-7462 ). However, it sounds like you called the Unscheduled Leave Call-in number ( 1-877-477-3273 ) if you got a reference number. Next time take pictures of your road way conditions.

     You are correct, it was the Unscheduled line. We were given a card with that one. Though I'm sure they went over the Emergency Hotline in orientation, I had quite forgotten about it. I did take pictures to keep record of it in case worst came to pass though I know that may not have helped anyways.
    

-- Why didn't you PM have your contact information? Or too lazy to look it up?
     
     They do have it, I just felt I was just being put on the spot for authority's sake. (My assumption of course. Not trying to put words in someone's mouth.)

-- If management pursues the AWOL, contact the ADR and mention the state of emergency being declared. Some counties maybe affected, some not, depending on location. If management drops the matter, consider yourself lucky and also your office may not be one you want to work at.

     It has not been brought up since then. I did eventually make it in about after 2 that afternoon. I didn't broach the subject after the fact. Just came in and expected some type of talking to or write-up. Ironically enough, I believe our office had three accidents that day.

-- Stop by your neighborhood post office to check on RCA vacancies and also to double check if your PM actually called to verify your address as well as weather conditions.

     Thank you for the answers. I can't explain how much I appreciate having unbiased and straight forward answers to questions.

-- Keep a low profile for now.

     That has been my day one plan.

"I felt my personal safety was considered second to the job."

-- It was. When Super Storm Sandy was coming ashore in NJ, city carriers were on their routes. Several videos on-line covering mail carriers delivering during the recent snow storm.

    I will state, that working the in service now puts a lot of things in perspective. Though I know this won't reach a lot of ears/eyes: Thank you to the men and women whom have put themselves out there to see the service done even though in some cases they shouldn't be.

-- Welcome to the wonderful ( ? ) world of the USPS.

   Many thanks again.
12458
leavingPerson was signed in when posted
03-20-2017
07:11 PM ET (US)
/m12457 -- MikeCr. -- "what exactly changes when an RCA hits the 90 days worked?"

-- Congrats on completing your probationary period. Manglement probably didn't notice, so don't make a fuss about it.
   
-- Now you can be represented by a NRLCA office steward in dealings with manglement of a disciplinary nature. If your office doesn't have a steward, the Assistant District Representative ( ADR ) will act as your steward. Ask a regular carrier in your office who the ADR is and for contact address / phone number / e-mail.

-- Having completed your probationary period, you are eligible to transfer to another post office. The big requirement to transfer is there must be an RCA vacancy at the office you want to transfer to. ( and it sounds like that would be a good idea based on your storm experience. ) Page 48 of the current contract has the details. One detail not spelled out in the contract is if you are accepted at the new office, the old office has 30 days to release you after notification by the new post office.

-- I'd get a hold of the ADR and go over the details of the threat to be declared AWOL during storm conditions, especially if you called the USPS National Employee Emergency Hotline ( 1-888-363-7462 ). However, it sounds like you called the Unscheduled Leave Call-in number ( 1-877-477-3273 ) if you got a reference number. Next time take pictures of your road way conditions.
  
-- Could you have been terminated by not showing up? It is a possibility as manglement can fire RCA's for just about any reason during the probationary period and without union representation, they can get away with it. Although back a couple of years, the Postmaster General stated RCA's are "to be kept at all costs."

-- Why didn't you PM have your contact information? Or too lazy to look it up?

-- If manglement pursues the AWOL, contact the ADR and mention the state of emergency being declared. Some counties maybe affected, some not, depending on location. If manglement drops the matter, consider yourself lucky and also your office may not be one you want to work at.

-- Stop by your neighborhood post office to check on RCA vacancies and also to double check if your PM actually called to verify your address as well as weather conditions.

-- Keep a low profile for now.

"I felt my personal safety was considered second to the job."

-- It was. When Super Storm Sandy was coming ashore in NJ, city carriers were on their routes. Several videos on-line covering mail carriers delivering during the recent snow storm.

-- Welcome to the wonderful ( ? ) world of the USPS.
12457
MikeCr.
03-20-2017
05:21 PM ET (US)
Hello again. Thank you to all who reply, and for your time. It's greatly appreciated. I will try to keep the wall of text as small as possible.

- I've worked my 90 days as an RCA. Even shorted myself some days to make sure to cover myself. I'm most likely over 100 days, than 90. Is there anything I need to do about my 90 days worked, like let anyone know that I'm over my 90 days, and what exactly changes when an RCA hits the 90 days worked?

- A couple of months ago, we had a pretty big winter/ice storm here in the South. My work office is a couple of counties away from my residence. That county wasn't hit as bad, but mine was. It was a Saturday, and I had stayed up as soon as the precipitation started sticking. So after a couple of hours, around 5 or 6 in the morning, I called the call-in line to report I would not be able to report to work using the correct options, and taking down my reference number. I then notified my supervisor, and then my post master. Around 7, I was contacted by my post master stating that he was refusing my call-in. Basically I was told other people were making it in, and I was expected to as well. If I failed to report I was considered AWOL. Furthermore, he wanted my address, and stated he was going to call my county's post office to see about my area. I was distraught to say the least, but around 1:30 that afternoon, I skidded down my icy roads, and eventually made it. My apologies for the long story, but I have some questions about this incident: First, I had not completed my 90 days worked, if I had not shown up, would I have been terminated? Second, we were considered a state of emergency by the state governor, does that have any bearing if I had been terminated? I was left with a bitter taste in my mouth that I felt my personal safety was considered second to the job. And furthermore, I had not called in on any days I had been scheduled, so to add to it, I felt my integrity was also being questioned when I was asked my address, and told my local post office was going to be called and asked about my location.

-Lastly, as far as transferring to another office, should I phone or go in person to speak with the post master of the office I wish to transfer to? And is there anything through liteblue I need to do?

Again thank you for any replies. I apologize for the massive text wall.
Edited 03-20-2017 05:36 PM
12456
leavingPerson was signed in when posted
03-20-2017
04:24 AM ET (US)
/m12455 -- postal-mike -- "I am a rural carrier, After completing my route do I have to help on another route that is vacant because the carrier called out sick"

-- Sorry, you need to be more specific as to your designation.
-- A carrier calling out sick is not really an "official" emergency situation, although in a small post office, it could be disastrous.
-- If you are a regular rural carrier, the answer is no. Page 46 of the new contract: A regular rural carrier shall not be required to serve all or part of any route other than his or her assigned route accepted as provided in ELM, Section 546. There is no official way to pay you, however manglement can get "creative" in payments. If manglement gives you a direct order to help out, per the NRLCA, carry out the order, then file a grievance.
-- If an AUX RCA -- yes. The new contract provides for AUX carriers to help out anywhere, after competition of their route.
-- If an RCA filling in for a regular rural carrier who is out for an extended time -- probably -- although the extra assistance could lead to overtime.
-- If an RCA -- yes -- even if working Sunday deliveries for Amazon. It's manglement's job to manage. Not your fault if manglement puts you into overtime.
-- That being said, the spirit of cooperation to get the job done usually prevails in small offices, even to the point of crossing crafts to the the mail delivered.
12455
postal-mike
03-19-2017
09:12 PM ET (US)
I am a rural carrier, After completing my route do I have to help on another route that is vacant because the carrier called out sick
12454
comfortablynumbPerson was signed in when posted
03-18-2017
09:02 AM ET (US)
/m12453 I scan the manifest AND all the parcels. Another carrier in my small office does the same for his route. I fill out my 3996 and write "parcel pick up" to cover my ESTIMATED time. Sometimes it's 10 parcels and sometimes it's 100. A couple of idiot PM's over the years have gone out to customer and told them to bring them to office. I've spoken to the customers before hand and told them to tell the PM that your F'in TV commercials say "Carrier will pick up parcels", now get the hell out of my shop. The last 2 PM's have left my customers alone. We get paid by the hour.. Embrace anything we have to do that earns us more money AND "protects the route" for the next generation of carriers.
12453
portuguesa
03-16-2017
10:52 PM ET (US)
Hello! Please, does anyone know the do's and don'ts of parcels pick up? My questions: even when we scan the barcode on the paper requesting the service, are we still required to scan the parcels individually? Some customers have home-based business and usually have over 200 parcels to be pick up! Txt much in advance!
12450
leavingPerson was signed in when posted
03-15-2017
10:00 PM ET (US)
/m12448 -- James -- Don't rush out and buy a second vehicle to run an AUX as AUX routes are not bid, they are offered to qualified substitutes, rural carrier associates, and rural carrier relief employees in the order of the longest continuous period of service at that office, without regard to classification. Being new, you most likely will not be the one getting the AUX route. That being said, if the route was just 2 hours a day, that may be a turn off for most RCA's, so you might get it after all. AUX routes can go up to 42 standard hours per week. Pretty sure you won't get one of those.

-- You should already have a route capable vehicle. That used to be a requirement to be hired as an RCA. If you are in an all-LLV office, might get away without a route vehicle. But if the route's LLV is not available ( might get taken in for maintenance without providing a replacement LLV, manglement may ask you to use your POV. You can say safely say "NO" as you are not required to.

-- You will get the salary of a regular when you become a regular. A Part-Time Flexible ( PTF ) carrier is an RCA position which is considered a career position and earns annual leave, but in a different manner than a regular carrier. If you get a PTF position, you can not turn down becoming a regular carrier. An RCA filling in for a regular carrier, who is out for an extended period of time, will start earning annual and sick leave after the 90th day of filling in and be credited for leave from day one. Like the PTF, leave is earned differently than a regular carrier. When the regular carrier returns to work the RCA will no longer be in a leave earning status and get a lump sum for any annual leave earned.

-- Thanx to RIKSNY ( snow bound? ) for the explanation on the route classifications. J-routes get preference for Saturday relief days. However if the carrier and manglement agree, the carrier can select any non-Saturday for the relief day. In a Formula Office, regular carriers may be forced into a non-Saturday relief day. Voluntarily taking a TUE-WED-THUR for a relief day will allow a K-route carrier to grow to 53 to 55 standard hours.

-- For future reference: As an RCA, you must have one year of continuous service before you can bid on a route. Be sure to study up on the e-bidding process as that is the only way to bid. Be sure to make a print-out of the bid confirmation page. If you don't know, ask another RCA or a regular carrier how to access liteblue.

-- Welcome to the USPS and good luck. BTW, having completed your probationary period of 90 work-days, the NRLCA union can represent you.
12449
RIKSNYPerson was signed in when posted
03-15-2017
06:38 PM ET (US)
Aux route won't get you the benefits or the pay of a regular. K means the route you are assigned to has every Saturday off. (As opposed to a J route, every other Saturday off; or an H route, works 6 days a week ).
Edited 03-15-2017 07:03 PM
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