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TOPIC:

Sociology of Books

10
Deleted by topic administrator 07-03-2008 02:32 AM
9
Sandra
05-17-2008
08:12 PM ET (US)
BLATANT RACISM AND HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS IN CANADA

As their wrong doings of racism and pre and post 911 intolerance of legalized immigrants, specially of nonwhites is exposed, north americans cannot bear exposure to truth and use see through wall devices to target and harass immigrants in north america, using see through wall devices from neighborhood and through passing cars to see through walls of immigrants homes and drive and bang car doors loudly at appropriate times, wastefully and arrogantly around for every living movement of the immigrants inside their homes, including females and males, including in bathroom and toilet. However, they attempt to judge immigrants through see through wall technological devices in the name of post 911, and use it to harass immigrants living their daily lives. Using these devices, living, breathing, eating, sleeping, toilet, household chores, sexual activities, masturbation and body movements of female and male immigrants is prohibited in the name of keeping a strict watch on the movements of immigrants post 911, that is illegal harassment and racism, the exposure of truths that the wrongdoers cannot bear. For every body movement of immigrants inside their owned or rented homes or apartments, neighborhood nonsense and harassment prevails violating immigrants privacy and human rights; whereas the their bony assed lickers, are given these illegal equipments through connivance of cops and their police state who cannot bear immigrants but only want the money, brains of immigrants and other countries. This amounts to human rights and privacy violations and sexual and pyschological harassment. The whites are the biggest criminals and terrorists themselves twisting the word of God to portray nonwhites in bad light and themselves in good light. The whole of North America is in heavy debt; however, their media fools them and the world, and they go as merceneries to other countries through their evil colonial tactics of wars, business, and infiltration, to screw the world of its resources, to invite immigrants and then to screw them of their money and happiness through racial profiling on the pretext that obtaining visa is a privilege; however following it with racial harassment is morally abhorent. Their culture teaches them to screw other cultures, look down on other cultures, and to teach other cultures that all cultures are of downtroddens and only North American culture is the right culture! Wow! Nothing more could be farther than truth. This reflects the outright blasphemy and racial obnoxiousness of the North American culture itself! That is the downsliding quality inside of north america, not much of which is portrayed to the outside world through corporate controlled duping mainstream media.

Volunteers are welcome to circulate these informations to those whom it might be helpful, to be aware of these ugly factors prevailing within north america. It seems the north american forgotten many of their teachings, e.g., 'Thou shalt have no other Gods but one', 'Do unto others as you would have others do unto you', etc.

http://www.yourluckytoday.blogspot.com



Burke, J. & Warren, P. (2002). How mobile phones let spies see our every move. The
Observer, October 13. Retrieved April 3, 2006, from
http://observer.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/sto...6903,811027,00.html

McGowan, Dave. (2000, June). Sony’s Magic cameras. Retrieved December 19, 2006, from
http://www.davesweb.cnchost.com/cameras.htm

Hearn, Kelly. (2001, April 18). High tech cop tools see through walls. United Press
International cited on CommonDreams.org. Retrieved September 29, 2006, from
http://www.commondreams.org/headlines01/0418-04.htm

Bush, Steve. (2002, August 12). Radar with Cell Phones? Look at CellDar. Retrieved,
November 29, 2006, from http://3nw.com/pda/radar_with_cell_phones__look_at_celldar.htm

Bush, Steve. (2006, November 17). Police will use radar to see through walls. Electronics
Weekly. Retrieved December 22, 2006, from
http://www.electronicsweekly.com/Articles/...se+radar+to+see+thr
ough+walls.htm

Chan, Hans, H. (1999, June 4). Cops have eyes on x-ray vision. New technology would let
police see through walls. New York: APBNews.com. Retrieved December 22, 2006, from
http://www.angelfire.com/nj3/soundweapon/xray.htm

Hunt, A., Tillery, C., & Wild, N. (2001). Through-the-wall surveillance technologies.
Corrections Today, 63(4), p. 132.

Jones, Willie. D. (2005, November). No place to hide: Portable radar devices see through
walls and report what’s inside. IEEE Spectrum Online. Retrieved November 29, 2006, from
http://www.spectrum.ieee.org/nov05/2146

Miles, Donna (2006, January 3). New device will sense through concrete walls. American
Forces Information Service. US Department of Defense. Retrieved December 19, 2006, from
http://www.defenselink.mil/news/Jan2006/20060103_3822.html

Sanders, Jane (2001, April 12). Flash of force: Radar flashlight could help police detect
suspects hiding behind doors and 8-inch thick walls. Georgia Institute of Technology
Research News. Retrieved December 19, 2006, from
http://gtresearchnews.gatech.edu/newsrelease/RADARFLASH.html

Simonite, Tom. (2006, November 14). Compact radar tracks movement through a wall. New
Scientist. Retrieved December 19, 2006, from
http://www.newscientisttech.com/channel/tech/weapons/dn10524

This new radar can see through walls. Retrieved December 22, 2006, from
http://www.primidi.com/2004/07/02.html


An internet search of through the wall surveillance and infrared technology will reveal plenty of additional material. Also see http://www.bullseye.tvheaven.com You are welcome to share this information with your colleagues, friends, relatives, locally and worldwide. North americans and Canadians are incapable of living up to doing unto others as they would have others do unto them.


Here are the wall-see-through technology links obtained through search engines on internet; also you can obtain more of wall-see-through and infrared technology information through surfing the web:

Burke, J. & Warren, P. (2002). How mobile phones let spies see our every move. The Observer, October 13. Retrieved April 3, 2006, from
http://observer.guardian.co.uk/uk_ne...811027,00.html

McGowan, Dave. (2000, June). Sony’s Magic cameras. Retrieved December 19, 2006, from
http://www.davesweb.cnchost.com/cameras.htm

Hearn, Kelly. (2001, April 18). High tech cop tools see through walls. United Press International cited on CommonDreams.org. Retrieved September 29, 2006, from
http://www.commondreams.org/headlines01/0418-04.htm

Bush, Steve. (2002, August 12). Radar with Cell Phones? Look at CellDar. Retrieved, November 29, 2006, from
http://3nw.com/pda/radar_with_cell_p...at_celldar.htm

Bush, Steve. (2006, November 17). Police will use radar to see through walls. Electronics Weekly. Retrieved December 22, 2006, from
http://www.electronicsweekly.com/Art...ough+walls.htm

Chan, Hans, H. (1999, June 4). Cops have eyes on x-ray vision. New technology would let police see through walls. New York: APBNews.com. Retrieved December 22, 2006, from
http://www.angelfire.com/nj3/soundweapon/xray.htm

Hunt, A., Tillery, C., & Wild, N. (2001). Through-the-wall surveillance technologies. Corrections Today, 63(4), p. 132.
Jones, Willie. D. (2005, November). No place to hide: Portable radar devices see through walls and report what’s inside. IEEE Spectrum Online. Retrieved November 29, 2006, from
http://www.spectrum.ieee.org/nov05/2146

Miles, Donna (2006, January 3). New device will sense through concrete walls. American Forces Information Service. US Department of Defense. Retrieved December 19, 2006, from
http://www.defenselink.mil/news/Jan2...0103_3822.html

Sanders, Jane (2001, April 12). Flash of force: Radar flashlight could help police detect suspects hiding behind doors and 8-inch thick walls. Georgia Institute of Technology Research News. Retrieved December 19, 2006, from
http://gtresearchnews.gatech.edu/new...ADARFLASH.html

Simonite, Tom. (2006, November 14). Compact radar tracks movement through a wall. New Scientist. Retrieved December 19, 2006, from
http://www.newscientisttech.com/chan...eapons/dn10524

This new radar can see through walls. Retrieved December 22, 2006, from
http://www.primidi.com/2004/07/02.html
8
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
06-26-2005
09:13 PM ET (US)
The reason surveys suck

Not just the ones that Canadians lie to. Sociologists are a rat pack of bullshitting con artists.

All social research is based on indirect experience; borrowed data; other people's accounts of what they are thinking and feeling. Direct observation of behaviour helps to bridge the gap but that still doesn't tell us why people are doing what they're doing. If I tried to question you directly about your motivations - why you married that person, bought that house, voted for that candidate - you'd probably offer me some plausible crumb in response. The more rational you made it sound, the less I'd be convinced.

The trouble with questions is that they always elicit answers, and you never know whether the answers only exist because the questions were posed. So when I really need to know, or at least be able to imagine, why people do things, I have to find out by means other than asking direct questions.

Hm, I've pissed off my country and my life partner. Can I go for the trifecta and alienate my parents? Read on and see!


Home
7
Martin WallacePerson was signed in when posted
01-12-2004
09:08 AM ET (US)
But see, Rachel, one of my academic interests is the study of literary studies (Oh, I am such a nerd!) throughout the 20th century. You might be interested to read some of the early reactions to "close reading." Many of its early opponents reacted to it the same way that Bloom reacts to Moretti. It would ruin the study of literature! That's not reading, it's scientific analysis! Of course, the proponents of close reading were reacting to ways of teaching literature that were either dull philology, thinly disguised history, or impressionistic lectures by men of "refined feeling."

My first degree is in Math and English (Nerd! Nerd!) so I don't mind graphs. I'll see if I can find Keating's book--if the library ever lets me borrow books again. It sounds right up my alley.
6
Rachel LebowitzPerson was signed in when posted
01-12-2004
08:49 AM ET (US)
Good point, Martin. I've read some very interesting essays/books that focus on print culture/what the majority of people were really reading, etc. I don't think those popular books should be studied per se (since that means close reading a 19th Century V.C. Andrews book) but I find such study interesting, and yes, I do think it's important to get a reality check and not just be immersed in the canon all the time.

I love social history, so that's why I think such an approach is interesting, but Moretti's way of going about it seems dull, dull, dull. Charts and graphs? You know, I was told there'd be no math!

I haven't read all of it yet, but Peter Keating's _The Haunted Study A Social History of the English Novel 1875-1914_ is good (first published, 1989). To quote from the back of the book, it looks at "who produced [the literature], who published it, who bought it, and who read it." Clearly written, with NO GRAPHS!
5
Martin WallacePerson was signed in when posted
01-12-2004
08:28 AM ET (US)
Since its astonishingly recent debut as an academic subject, the study of English literature has been pulled in two directions: one towards humanistic ideals, the other toward intellectual "rigour" and validity. The tension between these two directions is what creates a lot of controversy both within and without the academy. The article mentions Russian Formalism, but a more recent attempt to turn literary criticism into a "science" is found in the work of Canada's own Northup Frye (esp. in Anatomy of Criticism) and, of course, the recent turn toward theory. (I would include the New Criticism of the 40s and 50s in this category too, although some would not.)

Partially this move is an attempt to protect literary scholarship from the charge that it is "mere chatter about Shelley," (which it sometimes is). For good overviews of the development of literary studies within the academy, read Gerald Graff's "Professing Literature" (for the American case) or D.J. Palmer's "The Rise of English Studies" (for the British case), in which you read the snooty judgment of an early twentieth-century education official that literature is a suitable academic subject for "women and second-rate men." For a briefer take on this subject see http://www.doit.gmu.edu/inventio/main.asp?...pring03&sID=wallace . The author of this piece seems a reasonably smart fellow, in my view.

In any case, horrifying as some of Moretti's comments may seem (although anyone who makes Harold Bloom shudder is all right in my books), I like much of what lies behind his thinking. Most of the discussions about "literature" that I'm part of (whether in academia or, ahem, small literary communities) start with an implicit rejection of 99.999999% of books. I'm not saying that we should suspend judgment, but I find it peculiar on some level that people tend to make grand sweeping statements about a phenomenon based on such a disproportionate sample of it.
4
Zach WellsPerson was signed in when posted
01-12-2004
02:48 AM ET (US)
Yeah, I was thinking along the same lines. He's trying to sex it up by saying that reading books should be abandoned (and as BN's comments suggests, many have already headed in that direction), but it's a fundamentally rational approach to the quantitative study of literature as sociological phenomenon. Not one I'm particularly interested in, but hey, different strokes...
3
Paul VermeerschPerson was signed in when posted
01-11-2004
11:56 PM ET (US)
I don't see anything radical about Moretti's scholarship. It seems like a perfectly sensible thing to do for a literary historian, archivist, or library scientist. I don't think it's the sort of thing that should supersede textual literary scholarship, but it certainly would be useful as a supplement to the canonical thinking about literary history.
2
Zach WellsPerson was signed in when posted
01-11-2004
11:44 PM ET (US)
Oh, brave new world...
1
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
01-11-2004
09:37 PM ET (US)
Statistically Speaking

A prof thinks English Lit scholars should stop reading books.** English Lit scholars read books?



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