top bar
QuickTopic free message boards logo
Skip to Messages

TOPIC:

CSE 130 Homework #9 and Final

^     All messages            72-87 of 87  56-71 >>
87
Deleted by topic administrator 07-22-2006 07:22 AM
86
Riley
07-22-2006
01:05 AM PT (US)
Pretty nice discussion, want to see much more on it! :) Congrats on your work. Sorry I wont get to see you at worlds. famvir and shingles webpage devoted to famvir and shingles. spironolactone weight loss webpage devoted to spironolactone weight loss.
  Messages 85-82 deleted by topic administrator 07-22-2006 09:28 AM
81
Hard Final
03-15-2004
10:46 PM PT (US)
That final sucked! It was 50 points all on Prolog and ML, which wasn't very representative of the course. I hope the curve is low and grading scale adjusted differently than 50% final!
80
alex
03-15-2004
06:38 PM PT (US)
You too, Fox.
79
alex
03-15-2004
06:32 PM PT (US)
Thanks, Sean. Once again, your intelligence and devilish good looks have kept me from dropping this class in frustration.
78
Fox Harrell
03-15-2004
04:36 PM PT (US)
Yongbo:

You should figure it out as an exercise. Use the type precedence rules on page 313 of Sethi.
77
Fox Harrell
03-15-2004
04:31 PM PT (US)
Taybo:

Your answer is not correct. Think of it this way:

Would you draw the array layout differenly for integers vs reals (which take up more space in memory)? For allocation you actually need to know the sizes of array elements. Sethi says "the layout of the array determines the machine address of an element A[i] relative to the address of the first item." "The machine address" has to do with location, not size. Locations can be described using relative addresses.
76
Yongbo
03-15-2004
04:20 PM PT (US)
 fn : ('a * 'b -> 'b) -> 'a list -> 'b -> 'b

What does the above function type mean?
75
TayboPowar
03-15-2004
03:50 PM PT (US)
In the posted solutions for the midterm, problem 1, the definition of layout is given as "determine locations for storage." The other feasible solution is "determine the sizes for storage needed." Shouldn't it be the latter? I thought allocation is when you actually assign memory, and layout is when you just see "how it looks" in some abstract place in memory, more or less.

Thanks for the clarification.
74
Sean O'RourkePerson was signed in when posted
03-15-2004
02:39 PM PT (US)
Mickey - this is how "not()" is (or can be) implemented. To see how it works, and to gain a much better understanding of how prolog works, I encourage you to try tracing through the search tree in both the "X is true" and "X is false" cases. Remember: prolog tries rules from top to bottom, and satisfies subgoals from left to right.
73
Mickey
03-15-2004
01:44 PM PT (US)
In "Notes on Chapter 11", there is an example of using "not" together with "!(cut)".

not(X) :- X, !, fail.
not(X).

not(fly(penguin)). // #1

not(fly(X)). // #2

so how do these work? What does "succeed" in the sentence "the first caluse for not will try to make fly(penguin) succeed" mean? Why does #2 produce incorrect results?
72
Fox Harrell
03-15-2004
05:24 AM PT (US)
Amir:

Maybe you have done all this already but:

Of course read chapter 1 in the book.

Also check here:
http://www-cse.ucsd.edu/users/goguen/papers/compl.html
and here:
http://www-cse.ucsd.edu/users/goguen/courses/130/s1.html

Finally, review your lecture notes from the first week of class.

You don't need to know anything about the theory of evolution in biology. Just the evolution of programming languages.
71
Amir
03-15-2004
12:48 AM PT (US)
Last touch up question.

Would you please discuss, the history of evolution and emphasis on why , not when or who. Or at least point me in the direction of where I could do some reading on that.

Thanks, much appreciated.

Amir
^     All messages            72-87 of 87  56-71 >>

Print | RSS Views: 2743 (Unique: 959 ) / Subscribers: 1 | What's this?