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TOPIC:

The Law

29
Spam deleted by QuickTopic 08-24-2011 10:57 PM
28
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
01-04-2006
09:52 PM ET (US)
The literature of legal indictments

Hot stuff, people. I actually get off reading legal opinions. They're so clear and concise.


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27
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
11-07-2005
10:08 AM ET (US)
Folk you, Potter!

Those folk musicians suing against the release of Harry Potter because a fictitious band in the movie has a similar name have lost. This is a frightening development because it is bound to destroy the band's livelihood, from which they stood to make HUNDREDS of dollars each year.


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26
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
10-27-2005
10:10 AM ET (US)
Shame shame

Canadians cashing in on Harry Potter via American-style lawsuits? How deeply shameful. Suck it up, you Manitoban hippies.


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25
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
07-28-2005
03:56 PM ET (US)
George! You weren't supposed to tell...
24
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
07-28-2005
01:57 PM ET (US)
I think that's the spell that kills Dumbledore...

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23
paul vermeerschPerson was signed in when posted
07-28-2005
01:55 PM ET (US)
Got it.

As the US one dollar bill says, "Novo Ordo Seculorum."
22
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
07-28-2005
11:38 AM ET (US)
Works here. Try again.

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21
paul vermeerschPerson was signed in when posted
07-28-2005
11:22 AM ET (US)
The link appears to be down right now.
20
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
07-28-2005
10:17 AM ET (US)
Progress

If I ever have to stand trial in North Carolina, I'm going to insist on swearing oath on Ford Maddox Ford's The Good Soldier.

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Edited 07-28-2005 10:17 AM
19
Deleted by topic administrator 07-24-2005 12:01 PM
18
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
03-08-2005
11:11 PM ET (US)
Hell, I'd like to sue the Post for making fill out that dumb-assed form every time I want to read a story there...

An interesting case of cross-border libel that has a coalition of newspaper knickers in quite the twist.

At worst, the media fear the case, which goes to court in Toronto today, could force them to block access to their websites and electronic databases from some countries, shrinking the Internet's global reach. Some news organizations, they say, may have to shut down their websites altogether.

(From PFW)



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17
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
02-10-2005
10:19 PM ET (US)
What's the difference between a newspaper being wrong about a public official and being libelous?
 
This. (From Bookslut)



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16
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
11-29-2004
11:45 PM ET (US)
And racy limericks will get you twenty

Ah, poetry. If only you too could still cause riots like your poor cousin the football chant.

FOOTBALL fans are to face a 10-year ban from stadiums across Scotland for singing sectarian songs.

The clampdown will give courts the power to impose harsh penalties on hooligans and yobs who abuse players and taunt fellow supporters with religious chants.



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15
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
11-14-2004
04:16 PM ET (US)
Pay up, poet

An update on that poet/journo dude who was being sued by the millionaire on the Isle of Man... He's not going to prison. Well, we don't know about debtor's prison yet...



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14
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
11-11-2004
11:37 PM ET (US)
Isle of Man, O man...

A poet is being sued for libel by a millionaire on the self-governing Isle of Man. Apparently the poet/journalist posted "unflattering remarks" about the millionaire on a local website. I'm sure the traffic is huge and has damaged his reputation with the indigenous rocks.

Thanks to what one media lawyer calls the Isle of Man's neanderthal approach to libel, Mr Gubay has already had Mr Drower's computers seized, and subjected him to a six-month gagging order which prevented him even from explaining to his family what was happening to him.

"It has been Kafka-esque" said Mr Drower, 51, a computer technician and part-time performance poet. "I couldn't tell my partner why I was putting a suit on and going out to court hearings."

The collision between the two men has shed an unflattering light on the Isle of Man's attitude to free speech: it has no equivalent of the 1981 English law protecting journalists from revealing sources, and has failed to bring into force its own Human Rights Act, despite passing one three years ago under pressure from the UK.

Um, England? Now that you've destroyed the rest of the cultures around you, why not finish the job?



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13
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
09-26-2004
11:25 PM ET (US)
I have something in my eye, I tell you!

Okay, this is just way too much for me.

Thomas is one of 35 female inmates at the jail participating in a program called "Read Me A Story." The program, a partnership between the Arlington library and the county sheriff's office, allows incarcerated mothers to read books to their children on audiocassette tapes. The tapes are sent to the child with the book selected by the mother.

Poor little tykes. Poor mamas. I... um. I... ah... oh, god... Ninjas don't cry! End communication!



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12
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
09-07-2004
09:44 PM ET (US)
File under: discreetly fired six months later for "violation of dress code"

Lazy-assed French author spared the pink slip (don't they all wear maids' outfits there anyway?)



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11
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
07-31-2004
04:03 PM ET (US)
Katie.com
Penguin Putnam launches a book called Katie.com, and a new mother with the same domain name finds herself in a legal mess.


Since your book was published, my life has been completely invaded by its presence. Friends and colleagues have contacted me asking if it were me that were molested. Strangers have emailed me with upsetting stories of their own experiences. Others have contacted me asking me to put dubious content on the site, and countless other intrusions.

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10
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
05-17-2004
10:05 PM ET (US)
"At long last, the Department of Correction not only sees the value of the program, but has now gotten behind it"

Remember Wally Lamb's prison ... ers ... who took creative writing lessons and then published an anthology with HC? Remember how one of them won a PEN award and the bastards at the prison shut down the program and erased five years' worth of their writing files from the computers? Well, that's all fixed now that the story's out. That's what I like about American justice -- a little bad press and it'll flip flop like a bass in a dry bucket. Someone oughtta club it. (Also from PFW)



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9
KathrynkPerson was signed in when posted
05-14-2004
06:24 AM ET (US)
What a delightful behaviour modification. It sounds exactly like, uh, school.
8
Paul VermeerschPerson was signed in when posted
05-13-2004
11:50 PM ET (US)
Ah yes... books as punishment. Just like when I was growing up on Planet Philistinia.
7
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
05-13-2004
09:19 PM ET (US)
This Court Finds You Guilty and Sentences You to 253 Pages of Hard Labour...

No, not the new Tibor Fischer -- a new UK punishment for first offence juveniles will make kids read and report back on appropriate books.

Christopher Marsden, a former librarian, felt children and teenagers brought to court for first offences could benefit from books - be it Aesop's Fables or a gritty modern-day novel addressing drugs or crime.

And he's drawn up a list of 80 suitable titles for Kirklees Youth Offending Team.

Nice. This elevates books to the level of lines, peeling potatoes and digging ditches.



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6
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
04-07-2004
12:56 PM ET (US)
Think You Can Sue Someone for Republishing Your Work Without Permission?
It may not be that easy.
"Soderstrom sued Southam Incorporated in 1997 and also wants the law to change. If the publisher is paid every time someone accesses one of her articles, she wants some of the profit. Six years later her case has yet to be tried."

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5
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
03-21-2004
10:20 PM ET (US)
"We do need to address this because we have got a number of people coming out of jail who are intending to write books at this very moment."

More on the question of whether criminals should be allowed to profit (through book sales) from their crimes. Again, I offer the following answer: only if said criminal is me.



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4
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
03-04-2004
10:15 PM ET (US)
Does This Guy Need an Editor? Because I'm Free!

A Philadelphia judge lowered a lawyer's payments because of typos.* "Had the defendants not tired to paper plaintiff's counsel to death, some type would not have occurred. Furthermore, there have been omissions by the defendants, thus they should not case stones." The lawyer was charging $300 per hour, but the judge knocked it down to $150.



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3
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
02-25-2004
09:07 PM ET (US)
When the Law and Ethics Meet

Should a murderer be allowed to profit from a book about his crime? My heart says no, but the law might say yes.



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2
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
02-18-2004
09:04 PM ET (US)
And People Say the Semicolon Doesn't Matter

Apparently it does when gay marriage is at stake. (From Boing Boing)



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1
BookninjaPerson was signed in when posted
12-28-2003
11:10 PM ET (US)
The Courts Really Need to Decide on This Balrog Issue

A law student considers The Lord of the Rings. (LOL* Boingboing)



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